What can we learn from the air chemistry of crowds?

Jonathan Williams, Christof Stönner, Achim Edtbauer, Bettina Derstorff, Efstratios Bourtsoukidis, Thomas Klüpfel, Nicolas Krauter, Jörg Wicker, Stefan Kramer: What can we learn from the air chemistry of crowds?. In: Hansel, Armin; Dunkl, Jürgen (Ed.): 8th International Conference on Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry and its Applications, pp. 121-123, Innsbruck University Press, Innsbruck, 2019.

Abstract

Current PTR-MS technology allows hundreds of volatile trace gases in air to be measured every second at extremely low levels (parts per trillion). These instruments are often used in atmospheric research on planes and ships and even in the Amazon rainforest. Recently, we have used this technology to examine air composition changes caused by large groups of people (10,000-30,000) under real world conditions at a football match and in a movie theater. In both cases the trace gas signatures measured in ambient air are shown to reflect crowd behavior. By applying advanced data mining techniques we have shown that groups of people reproducibly respond to certain emotional stimuli (e.g. suspense and comedy) by exhaling specific trace gases. Furthermore, we explore whether this information can be used to determine the age classification of films.

BibTeX (Download)

@inproceedings{williams2019what,
title = {What can we learn from the air chemistry of crowds?},
author = {Jonathan Williams and Christof Stönner and Achim Edtbauer and Bettina Derstorff and Efstratios Bourtsoukidis and Thomas Klüpfel and Nicolas Krauter and Jörg Wicker and Stefan Kramer},
editor = {Armin Hansel and Jürgen Dunkl},
url = {https://www.ionicon.com/sites/default/files/uploads/doc/Contributions_8th-PTR-MS-Conference-2019_web.pdf#page=122},
year  = {2019},
date = {2019-05-10},
booktitle = {8th International Conference on Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry and its Applications},
pages = {121-123},
publisher = {Innsbruck University Press},
address = {Innsbruck},
abstract = {Current PTR-MS technology allows hundreds of volatile trace gases in air to be measured every second at extremely low levels (parts per trillion). These instruments are often used in atmospheric research on planes and ships and even in the Amazon rainforest. Recently, we have used  this  technology  to  examine  air  composition  changes  caused  by  large  groups of people  (10,000-30,000) under real world conditions at a football match and in a movie theater. In both cases the trace gas signatures measured in ambient air are shown to reflect crowd behavior. By applying advanced data mining techniques we have shown that groups of people reproducibly  respond  to certain emotional stimuli (e.g. suspense and comedy) by exhaling specific trace gases. Furthermore, we explore whether this information can be used to determine the age classification of films.},
keywords = {atmospheric chemistry, breath analysis, cinema data mining, data mining, emotional response analysis, machine learning, movie analysis, smell of fear, sof, time series},
pubstate = {published},
tppubtype = {inproceedings}
}